Hard Water on the Rise with Water Demand

Excerpt form WarrenPatch | by John Patten

“Over the years there has been an increase in the hardness of the water, especially around springtime (May)—this year, there is a very noticeable difference in the water quality over the last six weeks where even the use of a water softener is unable to overcome the greatly increased hardness,” Warren resident Alice Lin Yang said in an email.

She said she contacted New Jersey American Water in late-May to check a sample of the water, and was told the hardness level of 380mg per liter of calcium carbonate (the primary cause of water hardness) is within state and federal guidelines for safe drinking water—but is a “concern.” Lin Yang said the recommended level of calcium carbonate is 250mg per liter.

New Jersey American Water spokesman Richard Barnes said water hardness is considered an “esthetics” issue, but Lin Yang notes the many problems it’s causing Warren residents.

“The hardness has been effecting the dishwashers and faucets causing a chalky residue that is difficult to remove; it has caused itchy rashes of the face and body in others,” she said, adding some have told her they replaced dishwashers because they thought something was wrong with the machine.

Lin Yang, a doctor, also said she and others she knows have been having issues with skin rashes that appeared at about the same time this spring.

“The onset of the rashes coincide with the appearance of the white residue from the water,” she said.

Barnes said the company generally draws water from surfaces sources, but when temperatures rise and demand increases, the company will supplement the water supplies by drawing on wells, which typically have higher mineral content.

“When demand is not as high, we’re able to draw from our surface sources,” Barnes said, reducing the calcium carbonate in the water.

He added residents who have water softeners in their homes should check the settings to make sure they are set for a water hardness between 350mg per liter and 400mg per liter. “That’s really the best thing to do,” he said.

Read the full article at Township’s ‘Harder’ Water Raising Concerns

To find out more about what you can do about hard water contact your RainSoft dealer.

RainSoft Air and Water Conditioning Products

RainSoft water conditioning and drinking water systems are designed to meet a variety of water quality challenges, providing you with effective, affordable water conditioning solutions for achieving the best possible water quality for your home.

RainSoft of Rochester, New York – Anderson Watersystems

79 Saginaw Dr.
Rochester, NY 14623
585-385-6610

www.rainsoftofrochester.com

Hard Water, Calcium Build-up and High Energy Costs

Icky calcium build-up and high energy costs are just 2 of the many annoyances associated with hard water.

Save money and help the environment by checking on your water quality

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
(ARA) – Bruce Farrar didn’t like what hard water was doing to his home.

“Our dishes in the dishwasher were terrible,” says Farrar, who lives in Newport Beach, Calif. “The inside of the dishwasher was just covered with calcium. Also, our showers had glass doors and I had to put a special cleaner on them because of the calcium buildup.”

But the problems didn’t end there. Hard water was also preventing the family’s clothes washer from functioning properly, requiring the use of more soap and hotter water, which increased Farrar’s grocery bill and energy costs. The added energy needs were also putting more wear and tear on his hot water heater, decreasing its lifespan.

Nearly 90 percent of American homes have hard water – water containing high levels of calcium and magnesium, according to The U.S. Geological Survey. The hardest water is commonly found in the states that run from Kansas to Texas as well as in Southern California. How can you tell if you have hard water? If your shampoo and soap don’t lather up like they should, if you see scaling on your pipes and showerheads or if you have nasty brown rings in your sinks and toilets, your water is probably hard.

To know exactly how hard, and what to do about it, you should have your water diagnosed by a water quality professional.  Read more…